Halloween Countdown: Costume #4

4. The vampires from Bram Stoker’s Dracula. We all know that there are going to be a lot of sparkly-skinned vampires running around this year, or even perhaps what has become the classic look for the vampire: black hair with widow’s peak and cape.  But what was Stoker’s real vision for these monsters of the night?

Description of Dracula by Bram Stoker: “There he lay looking as if youth had been half-renewed, for the white hair and moustache were changed to dark iron-grey, the cheeks were fuller, and the white skin seemed ruby-red underneath; the mouth was redder than ever, for on the lips were gouts of fresh blood, which trickled from the corners of the mouth and ran over the chin and neck. Even the deep, burning eyes seemed set amongst the swollen flesh, for the lids and pouches underneath were bloated. It seemed as if the whole awful creature were simply gorged with blood; he lay like a filthy leech, exhausted with his repletion.”

Now for the brides of Dracula. In Stoker’s novel, the three women that live with Dracula are never referred to as his brides.  Two are described as having dark hair, while one, the leader, is desrcibed as being blonde. The only description Stoker really gives is of there “high aquiline noses, like the Count’s”. I could not find any descriptions of their clothing, but in almost ever photo of them in Google images, they are wearing long, white flowing gowns.

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One thought on “Halloween Countdown: Costume #4

  1. I like to see the story of Dracula as a mirror of our fears related to the theme of immortality. Dracula and vampires embody the symbols and inner-desires of humanity’s need to feel immortal to give meaning to life .

    “you are but mortal woman. Time is now to be dreaded – since once he put that mark upon your throat.”
    – Bram Stoker, Chapter 23, Dracula

    Moreover, with modernity comes a lack of reflexivity. Vampire’s are in a sense an embodiment of historicism. Vampires create a living historical figure that often relates to the modern man how times have changed, but also that simulacra is constantly masked by modernity’s pushing into the future at the expense of the tradition and acknowledged history.

    “I read that every known superstition in the world is gathered into the horseshoe of the Carpathians, as if it were the centre of some sort of imaginative whirlpool; if so my stay may be very interesting.”

    – Bram Stoker, Chapter 1, Dracula

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